Ben Aigan

Ben Aigan lies to the east of Rothes, the north east of Craigellachie and to the east of the River Spey which flows along the foot of its western and northern slopes. Rising to a height of 471m (1546 feet) and extensively forested apart from the summit cone, the top of Ben Aigan provides magnificent views over Speyside, south to Ben Rinnes, and away to the north over the Moray Firth to the hills of Sutherland

  • Unsuitable for wheelchairs and buggies
  • Defined hill path
  • Slopes throughout
  • Partly signed

Ben Avon from Tomintoul

Ben Avon is the most easterly mountain of the main Cairngorm range. It occupies a vast area to the north-east of Glen Quoich stretching towards Inchrory and the River Gairn, and it is recognisable from many viewpoints across Moray by the granite tors on the skyline of its long flat plateau.

  • Unsuitable for wheelchairs and buggies
  • Defined hill path
  • Slopes throughout
  • Some barriers
  • Unsigned

Ben Rinnes

Ben Rinnes is the highest freestanding mountain in Moray at 2733ft (841 metres), and is classified as a ‘Corbett’ – a summit lying between 2500ft and 2999ft. 

  • Unsuitable for wheelchairs and buggies
  • Defined hill path
  • Slopes throughout
  • Unsigned

Corryhabbie Hill & Cook’s Cairn

Corryhabbie is the highest point of the long moorland ridge between Glen Rinnes and the heads of Glenfiddich and Glenlivet. From the plateau-like summit there are extensive views over vast rolling hills and moors to the Cairngorms to the south and Ben Rinnes to the north.

  • Unsuitable for wheelchairs and buggies
  • Defined hill path
  • Slopes throughout

Dufftown – Pitglassie Viewpoint

Pitglassie Viewpoint is one of many walks in Dufftown, it is a circular path, but either way you have a bit of a climb.

  • Unsuitable for wheelchairs and buggies
  • Gradient: Undulating

    Steady climb from either direction

  • Unsigned

Dufftown – The Convals

The Convals (Meikle Conval, 571m and Little Conval, 552m) are the two ’rounded humps’ separated from Ben Rinnes by the ‘Beatshach’, the pass linking Speyside to Glen Rinnes.

Dufftown – The Viking Trail

The Viking Trail has two routes to follow one approximately five miles long the other being much longer at twelve miles.

  • 5 miles (8 km)
  • 300 meters (984 ft)
  • 2h 30 minutes
  • Unsuitable for wheelchairs and buggies
  • Mixed gradient

Forres – Califer Hill & Rafford

A circular walk along minor roads and footpaths with stunning views from Califer Viewpoint, returning via lower Rafford and the Dava Way with a shorter route option from Rafford Church available.

  • Suitable for a wide range of users
  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    Minor Roads, Grassy Lanes, Farm Tracks, Footpaths, Woodland Tracks, some potentially muddy and slippy parts following wet weather and some narrower sections.

  • Gradient: Generally level

    Most of this route is relatively level with the steepest section being the ascent and descent to and from Califer Hill Viewpoint.  The viewpoint ascends to 184.5m.

  • Barriers:

    There are footbridges to cross and some narrower sections.

  • Unsigned

The Fishwives Route

Follow the footsteps of the Fishwives. The Fishwives Path starts at the Buckie & District Fishing Heritage Centre where you will discover the unique fishing history of this lovely part of the Moray Firth.

  • Accessibility: Suitable for a wide range of users

    Suitable for more able and energetic walkers. The off road sections would be of interest to horse riders and mountain bikers.

  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    Nearly two thirds of the route is along tarmac roads and paths which are easy to negotiate. The rest is on farm/forestry tracks and grassy paths; the surface in places is rough and uneven and can be muddy in wet weather.

  • Gradient: Gentle gradients

    The route climbs from the sea at Buckie to around 270 metres (900ft) above sea level. From both the Keith and Buckie ends the path rises gradually to the highest point at Addie Hill.

  • Barriers: Some barriers

    Gates

  • Fully signed

The Gownie

A circular walk via Craigellachie and Aberlour for the more enthusiastic walker looking for some adventure. Initially follow Balvenie Street to the Railway Station. Walk along the platform to the left and cross the road into the car park to join the “Spur” to the Speyside Way.

  • Accessibility: Suitable for a wide range of users

    A route for the more energetic walker and cyclist.

  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    Mostly surfaced access tracks particularly in lowland section with some grassy paths through fields. Rough in places

  • Gradient: Slopes throughout

    Considerable gradients to the summit of the Gownie Path at a height of around 1000ft.

  • Barriers: Some barriers

    There are some stiles and gates to be negotiated.

Tomintoul – Carn Daimh

Cairn Daimh (Hill of the Stags) at 1866ft (570m) is most often ascended in the course of following the Tomintoul Spur of the Speyside Way, between Glenlivet and Tomintoul.

  • Partly signed