Archiestown – Cairn Cattoch

Cairn Cattoch Walk is one of several waymarked walks within the forest to the north of Archiestown.

  • Accessibility: Suitable for a wide range of users

    The route is suitable for a wide range of users, although cyclists may require to dismount on the short section to the viewpoint

  • Terrain: Forest tracks

    Mainly on forest track. There is a short section of rough earth path through heather to reach the summit viewpoint. Stout footwear is advised

  • Gradient: Mixed gradient

    Long gentle climb along most of route, with a steeper section leading to the viewpoint. A total climb of 130 metres (390ft) with the summit sitting at 369 metres (1120ft) above sea level

  • No barriers
  • Fully signed

Auchindachy and Mill of Towie Walks

Both of these walks are part of a network of waymarked and signed paths around Keith. Straddling both sides of the valley of the River Isla, the routes venture from the town into the delightful open countryside to the south of the town. Ramble along the country lanes and take in the rich scenery and extensive views to the hills and mountains.

  • Unsuitable for wheelchairs and buggies
  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    Both routes are mainly on tarred minor roads with some sections on farm tracks and grass/earth paths. Some sections can be muddy and overgrown at times, so sturdy footwear is advised.

  • Gradient: Undulating

    Generally undulating with a few steady gradients in places.

  • Barriers: Some barriers

    Several field gates along both routes and a narrow bridge with a step at Braehead (there is a ford along side which may be used by horses).

  • Fully signed

Brodie – Castle Path

Brodie Castle has a variety of paths offering a wide choice of scenic and historic features along the routes.

  • Accessibility: Accessible for all users

    The path around the pond and the woodland paths are suitable for wheelchairs and mobility scooters.

  • Forest tracks
  • Generally level
  • Barriers: Some barriers

    There is a gated single track road crossing between the Castle and the pond walk

Buckie – Gollachy Circular

This route explores the coast west of Buckie as far as the village of Portgordon, returning at a higher level with extensive views over the Moray Firth.

  • Accessible for all users
  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    Tarred pavements and gravel paths. A short section of earth path at Gollachy Burn can be muddy.

  • Gradient: Short steep sections

    Short steep section climbing up to the golf course near the Gollachy Burn

  • Fully signed

Buckie – Laird’s Way to Drybridge

The peaceful village of Drybridge sits above Buckie surrrounded by woods and farmland. Follow the way from Buckie over the Buckie Burn and past the distillery. On the way to Drybridge you will be rewarded with fine views over farmland and beyond to the Firth.

  • Fully signed

Buckie – Strathlene all abilities path

Located near Buckie, this is a short section of coastal all abilities path, which runs parallel to the rocky foreshore near the old Strathlene lido. There are views to the nearby Craigen Roan rock where seals can be regularly seen and heard. This path forms part of the Moray Coast Trail – Buckie.

  • Accessible for all users
  • Gravel path
  • Generally level
  • Fully signed

Burghead – Clarkly Hill Circular

A circular walk starting in the Pictish Fort town of Burghead and passing through farmland and rocky shores, with stunning views of the Moray Firth along the ridge of Clarkly Hill.

  • Unsuitable for wheelchairs and buggies
  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    Tarred pavements & roads, gravel paths, and earth/grass paths along the Clarkly Hill sections. Note: the earth paths are rough and uneven in places and can be muddy.

  • Gradient: Generally level

    A gentle slope rising from the Burghead - Lossiemouth road to Clarkly Hill

  • Fully signed

Culbin Forest- Route 99

One of Moray’s many Forestry Commissions woodlands with promoted access, it is located on the coastal sand dunes between Findhorn Bay and Nairn. It has a wide network of paths suitable for many users, including the signed all abilities trail, known as the Route 99. 

  • Accessibility: Accessible for all users

    Horse riders are better catered for at the Cloddymoss car park.

  • Generally level
  • Fully signed

Cullen – Crannoch Circular Path

The route provides a variety of views and habitats. Travelling clockwise, the first section east of Cullen provides open views over agricultural land and the coast. The woodland loop provides access to conifer/mixed woodland and freshwater habitats.

  • Suitable for buggies but not wheelchairs
  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    A mixture of pavements, quiet country roads, and farm tracks, with aggregate and earth paths through the woodland section. These woodland and farm tracks can be muddy in wet weather, and watch out for tree roots within Crannoch Wood. There is a short steep slope at the eastern entrance to the Crannoch Wood circular path, which can be slippy.

  • Gradient: Undulating

    Undulating route with long steady inclines/ declines. One steep section present at the eastern entrance to the Crannoch Wood circular path.

  • Barriers: Some barriers

    Care to be taken when crossing the A98 - this is a very fast and busy road. Several gates leading along the farm track from Cullen to Crannoch Wood.

  • Fully signed

Cullen – Salmon Bothy Circular

The Salmon Bothy Circular Path provides a short coastal walk, which takes in magnificent coastal views.

  • 1.6 miles (2.56 km)
  • 40 meters (131 ft)
  • 45 minutes
  • Accessibility: Unsuitable for wheelchairs and buggies

    There is a steep ramped path with handrail leading from the harbour area up to cliff top. Flat gravel path between the caravan park and the Nelson’s Seat viewpoint providing opportunity for less able bodied users.

  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    Fully surfaced roadside paths in the built up areas. Bound gravel paths elsewhere, with a short steep section of rough grassy path at the outlying gully. There are plans for this section to be upgraded to gravel.

  • Gradient: Mixed gradient

    Relatively flat throughout but there are two short steep sections.

  • Barriers: Some barriers

    There is a steep ramped path with handrail leading from the harbour area up to cliff top.

  • Fully signed

Drummuir – Paths Network

A suite of trails has been created on the Drummuir Estate developed by Drummuir 21, a local community group. Options exist for walks of approximately 40, 70 or 120 minutes duration depending on your inclination. Ideal for families. Part of the trail system is suitable for wheelchair users (about 3 miles return trip).

  • Accessibility: Accessible for all users

    The all abilities section is suitable for wheelchairs and buggies.

  • Terrain: Gravel path

    Relatively good surfaces throughout; mainly tarmac and gravel paths with a section of quiet public road. The All Abilities Trail section between the Botriphnie Kirk car park and Loch Park follows a level gravel path.

  • Mixed gradient
  • Fully signed

Dufftown – Dufftown Dramble

‘Rome was built on seven hills, Dufftown was built on seven stills’ – so goes the old rhyme. This walk, starting from the Dufftown clock-tower, links all the Dufftown distilleries in one walk.

  • Accessibility: Suitable for a wide range of users

    Able-bodied walkers, some sections can be cycled. The nature of the terrain and the presence of physical barriers would make the route difficult to negotiate on horseback.

  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    A mixture of tarmac, gravel and grass paths with some sections on public roads - look out for traffic. Short gradients and sections of uneven path.

  • Gradient: Undulating

    Generally level with short gradients.

  • Barriers: Some barriers

    A number of gates and steps.

  • Unsigned

Dufftown – Glenrinnes Way

A circular walk which will take you round some of the sights of Dufftown.

  • Accessible for all users
  • Terrain: Paved footpaths & roads

    A good generally level circular route with a steady climb no matter which way round you decide to walk it

  • Gradient: Generally level

    There is a steady slope to the Tomintoul Road but the ground is good.

  • No barriers
  • Fully signed

Dufftown – Gordon’s Cross

The Gordons Cross Path explores the countryside around Dufftown and gives good access to all the natural attributes the area has to offer throughout the four seasons.

  • Accessibility: Suitable for a wide range of users

    The section of route between Hardhaugh and the Crachie Road Bridge is not recommended for horses or cyclists due to the nature of the route surface and the presence of physical barriers.

  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    Fully surfaced roadside paths in the build up areas. Rough grassy and gravel paths in country sections.

  • Gradient: Short steep sections

    A total climb of 250 feet involved in traversing this route. Gentle inclines throughout but there are a few short steep sections.

  • Barriers: Some barriers

    Several gates require to be negotiated near Gordon’s Cross and beside the River Fiddich where there are also wooden steps.

  • Fully signed

Dufftown – Kings Grave

The Kings Grave is a short path which takes in many historical events which happened in the Dufftown area.

  • Suitable for a wide range of users
  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    Grass track. Parts may be muddy.

  • Gradient: Short steep sections

    Steady incline from Balvenie Castle.

  • Unsigned

Dufftown – Robbie Dhu

Robbie Dhu path does have a steep climb but has beautiful views to make it worth the effort.

  • 1.2 miles (1.92 km)
  • 50 minutes
  • Suitable for a wide range of users
  • Short steep sections

Dufftown- The Giant’s Chair

The ‘Giant’s Chair’ is a rock feature carved out by the power of the River Dullan in spate. This lovely walk takes in many interesting features of history, culture and landscape. Dufftown has seven operating whisky distilleries including the famous Glenfiddich brand.

  • Accessibility: Suitable for a wide range of users

    The route is suitable for walkers and mountain bikes.

  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    Mixture of tarmac, gravel and grass. Some rough sections near The Giant's Chair.

  • Gradient: Undulating

    An undulating path with some short steep sections. Total height climbed is around 200ft (60 metres).

  • Barriers: Some barriers

    Kissing gate at far end of this walk, and some flights of steps

  • Fully signed

Elgin – Kirkhill Right of Way

The Kirkhill path is part undulating earth surface and part tar road surface which is well used by local fisherman and runs for part of its length alongside the River Lossie.

  • Terrain: Varied surfaces

    Part tarmac and earth path. Earth path section (prone to flooding and muddy when wet) has livestock grazing on occasions.

  • Generally level
  • Barriers: Some barriers

    The route has three kissing gates and narrow bridge to negotiate.

  • Fully signed

Elgin – Millbuies Country Park

Millbuies Loch was created by the damming of streams to provide angling facilities on the loch.Moray District Council took over the estate in 1975 and the fishing was extended to the public.

  • Unsuitable for wheelchairs and buggies
  • Terrain: Gravel path

    Gravel or soil paths. Sections of the route are not suitable for buggies or wheelchairs.

  • Gradient: Undulating

    Generally level although there is a steep gradient down to the Loch.

  • Barriers: Some barriers

    Some steps, walkboards and bridges.

  • Partly signed